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U.S. Chamber of Commerce

U.S. Chamber of Commerce


The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is the world’s largest business organization representing the interests of more than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions. Our members range from mom-and-pop shops and local chambers to leading industry associations and large corporations. They all share one thing—they count on the Chamber to be their voice in Washington, D.C.

Advocacy

The fundamental activity of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is to develop and implement policy on major issues affecting business. Key to this effort is the work of committees, subcommittees, task forces, and councils involving more than 2,000 representatives of member corporations, organizations, and the academic community who serve voluntarily. In almost every instance, significant policy and public issue positions originate with one of these Chamber components.

History

The idea of a national institution to represent the unified interests of U.S. business first took shape when President William Howard Taft, in a message to Congress on December 7, 1911, addressed the need for a "central organization in touch with associations and chambers of commerce throughout the country and able to keep purely American interests in a closer touch with different phases of commercial affairs." Four months later, on April 22, 1912, President Taft's vision became a reality when a group of 700 delegates from various commercial and trade organizations came together to create a unified body of business interest that today is the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Please refer to the resources below from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.


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